Nova Dasalla – Acro Paragliding – Swing Trinity RS 18 – test flight

I want to thank Kim Phinney of White Owl Paragliding (https://www.whiteowlpg.com), the US importer for Swing, for asking me as the 1st pilot in the US to try out and give my opinion on their new acro glider, the Trinity…

Nova Dasalla - Acro Paragliding - Swing Trinity RS 18 - test flight

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I want to thank Kim Phinney of White Owl Paragliding (https://www.whiteowlpg.com), the US importer for Swing, for asking me as the 1st pilot in the US to try out and give my opinion on their new acro glider, the Trinity RS, which has some new safety technology that prevents the wing from collapsing with lesser frequency than other wings. (Of course, this would be an interesting characteristic to have in an acro glider.) You can read more about RAST here: http://technology.swing.de/?lang=en

I flew the 18m with AvaSport BASE harness so I was pretty loaded. The following are the tricks I tried with some comments on the behavior:

Esfera (I may have been the 1st pilot to complete this maneuver on the Trinity as there’s no video on the web yet) – my 1st attempt using the lower handles didn’t work, but once I used the upper ones, the Rhythmic worked very well and it stayed completely open and full of energy. I was in Infinite for just a few turns (I should’ve stayed in it much longer to see how well it held the energy – this is a behavior that other pilots have said is an issue). I was impressed that the wing stayed very open in Anti-Rhythmic with only a minor deflation on the low side right before SAT. I didn’t put weight-shift on that side as I wanted to see how it would do. I have a feeling that the RS technology helped a lot here.

Joker – I don’t think it’s possible to complete this maneuver without shorter brake travel. Because of this RS tech, the wing won’t let you stall it like most acro wings especially when there’s a lot of energy involved.

Twister – the Trinity definitely has an “anti-stall” feel to it as it doesn’t drop into deep stall as easily as true acro gliders do. And then, when it’s in deep stall, I found it slow to react/re-start to the other direction and, many times, wanted to push the A risers so it would get going.

Twisted stalls – because I used the lower handles, I couldn’t get the wing to stall when I felt it should’ve so I was never able to get a really good, symmetrical stall.

Misty flips – not sure if I needed more energy or entered them too late, but again, I felt the wing slow to react on the negative side. But, I’m sure it may have been different if I used the upper handles.

I’ve been in contact with a friend of mine who’s helping with the trimming and he had a different experience – better with the stalls/spins and not-so good with the dynamic tricks.

Overall, I think if they eliminated one of the ram air sections (I think there are at least 4), it may lessen the anti-stalling behavior making it more responsive to input. I found the wing very solid and likely able to do many tricks, but wouldn’t classify it as a true acro glider as it’s not able/very difficult to do many tricks which require you to spin/stall the glider quickly without having much shorter brake travel or lots of strength. (For example, if you have the RR acro handles, then you’d need to use the upper grips, for sure.)

IMO, an acro wing should do exactly what you want, when you want it. For a completely new wing, this would be my expectation. So, in its current form, the Trinity RS is a lower-level acro/upper-level freestyle wing so perfect for someone who’s starting out in acro and wants some safety built-in for peace-of-mind. But, for competition pilots, they’d want more.

Hope you found this assessment helpful!

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